Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Dont Know Much About the Civil War (Dont Know Much About Series) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Dont Know Much About the Civil War (Dont Know Much About Series) book. Happy reading Dont Know Much About the Civil War (Dont Know Much About Series) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Dont Know Much About the Civil War (Dont Know Much About Series) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Dont Know Much About the Civil War (Dont Know Much About Series) Pocket Guide.

Go no further than Gone with the Wind and then that becomes an accepted way that everybody thinks about the Civil War. I saw that movie when I was a kid and I loved it, so I guess I bought into that narrative, too. Well, so did Boston University—why is our mascot named Rhett?

They named the mascot not long after Gone with the Wind came out in It was building on the popularity of the movie. Have you been following the controversy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where protestors pulled down Silent Sam, the statue of a Confederate soldier?


  • My Call.
  • Don't Know Much About the Civil War - Kenneth C. Davis.
  • Globalisation, regionalism and economic interdependence?
  • Don't Know Much About the Civil War by Kenneth C. Davis | Penguin Random House Audio.
  • Don't Know Much About History - PDF Drive!

One of the interesting things about Silent Sam is that there was a PhD history student at UNC Chapel Hill who did some research, and he found a speech at the unveiling of the statue, in , that was given by a Confederate veteran named Julian Carr. You could actually say that when this statue was unveiled, the racist agenda was really apparent. When these Confederate monuments were put up, African Americans who lived in those communities were disenfranchised. It was a moment when really only white Southerners were allowed to make the decisions about what statues to put up and where to put them.

To me it seems only right that we revisit this and have everyone have a chance to be involved in those conversations and decide what to do with those monuments.

Don't Know Much About the Civil War - Audiobook (abridged) | Listen Instantly!

I wrote a book, The Romance of Reunion , that was basically about how the North learned to like the white South, the Confederate South, in the 50 years after the Civil War, about how they came to accommodate themselves to the Confederate story. So other people who had not actually been there were going to tell the story. How those stories get perpetuated into the next generation was interesting to me.

People like to tell stories about the past that make them feel good, or that help them make a particular political point. But history, as it happened, is not about a feel-good agenda or scoring political points. We need to see beyond the BS story and grapple with something closer to the truth. Sara Rimer spent 26 years as a reporter at the New York Times , where she wrote about education, the death penalty, immigration, and aging in America, and covered New England as the Boston bureau chief. The Times nominated her for the Pulitzer Prize.

Her coverage of the death penalty was cited by the Supreme Court in its landmark ruling outlawing the execution of developmentally disabled individuals. She began her career in journalism as a reporter in the two-person Naples, Fla. Boston University moderates comments to facilitate an informed, substantive, civil conversation.

Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours EST and can only accept comments written in English. The Lost Cause is a dark chapter in the American experience as it led to post war slave codes and lynching in the Confederate States of America.

Worse, the North came to believe that the South was right after all,leading to the Chicage race riots when whites killed a black youth for swimming on a whites only public beach. Now, the War Department, bought into the Lost Cause, and namef named our most important army bases after Confederate war criminals such as, Fort Bragg. Your email address will not be published. Surratt, perhaps a small player in the conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln, bore the brunt of the nation's urge for revenge due to Secretary of War, Stanton's manipulation of her military tribunal. Davis, also, does a good job of shining light on the under documented roles of women and African Americans before and during the war.

Slavery was recognized as a vile institution, yet whenever lawmakers addressed it in the years leading to the Civil War it was merely to "kick the can" down the road.

Don't Know Much About Teaching Minute from Kenneth C. Davis: 14th Amendment

Democracy is often about compromise -- we certainly hear passionate calls for that in this election year -- yet compromise does not equate to solution. We would be a better people if we created a vision of where we wanted to go and not just compromise around the journey's potholes. View 2 comments.

Mar 02, Elena Timofeeva rated it it was amazing. Well what I can say, my English is pretty intermediate as you can see from my comment, Even though I enjoyed that book, and it was quiet easy to read even for me, so I'm a bit surprised to read some comments here Hello, I'm Elena Timofeeva from Moscow, Russia. Well what I can say, my English is pretty intermediate as you can see from my comment, Even though I enjoyed that book, and it was quiet easy to read even for me, so I'm a bit surprised to read some comments here that say this book is boring, because it is not at all and an Author uses very clear and understandable language.

I'm really impressed, and I'm so thankful to Keneth. Davis , practically, I discovered new United States that I've never known before, I was shocked by the number of victims, I never knew that as well.. I understood a lot, even about modern history after this book. It's strange, but, at the beginning of the book, I hated slavery, and horrors that were on southern plantations, but by the end, I was terrified by the cruelty of Northerners who completely destroyed towns, in some Southern states and killed innocent people, woman and children.

Again I'm not here to judge, I only think that every American must remember what happened, and this book will be a good provider for those who would like to know more about that dark period of the American history. I like that this book contained so many primary sources so that I could understand what people were thinking and feeling.

Don't Know Much About History: Everything You Need to Know About American History but Never Learned

Davis sometimes includes light-hearted and humorous stories, which makes this book even more interesting and fun. In addition, I like the timelines and the fact that they include events, which were occurring outside of the Civil War, such as Indian battles in Colorado, or books being written by famous authors. Most of what is written about this time period focuses primarily on the Civil War, and I have often wondered what else was occurring during this period.

One example would be the westward migration of settlers. I also like the appendices in the back of the book, which compared the economies of the North and South. It really helped me to understand what each side was working with in terms of number of states, population, economy, factories, railroads, etc. One of my favorite parts of the book, however, was the 'Whatever Became Of?

It names many of the primary players in the Civil War, and tells what they went on to do after the war. It was interesting seeing so many connections between these people and the roles they played in our country's history.

Kenneth C. Davis

Finally, I appreciated the fact that this book was written in small increments. You can pick up the book, read a few pages, set it down, and come back to it later. This is great for when you are busy. Dec 25, Rebecca rated it it was ok Shelves: books-i-own , reference-books. Oh, I'm sorry, I was reviewing a book? Yeah, the thing about this book was, it was so boring, even thinking about it puts me to sleep. Dry and dull, it's full of disconnected factoids that read like so many lists rather than an overall coherent narrative. Although the author acts like he's digging deep into history, anyone who reads this without a good prior understanding is going to walk away with the trite and oft-disproved overview that the war was fought only over slaver Zzz Although the author acts like he's digging deep into history, anyone who reads this without a good prior understanding is going to walk away with the trite and oft-disproved overview that the war was fought only over slavery, the North was all good and the South was all bad.

I'm keeping this as a reference book, because it does have some good quotes and information, but I wouldn't read it as a book again. View 1 comment. Mar 14, Lisa Houlihan added it Shelves: amale , hist-soci-cultstud , nf.

Navigation menu

My own fault for reading such a book. But "On December 20, , a special convention met in Charleston, and South Carolina became the first state to leave the Union" is a ludicrous oversight that makes me doubt the author's validity. Mar 09, Chandler Jechura rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-i-own , overlooked-books , adult , hall-of-fame , must-read-non-fiction , history.

I think it is not a stretch to say that this is one of my favorite nonfiction books about the Civil War. This is because this is perhaps the most well written book that I have read in the nonfiction genre yet. It is extremely readable, and is a text that I would suggest to reluctant students of history for that reason alo I think it is not a stretch to say that this is one of my favorite nonfiction books about the Civil War. It is extremely readable, and is a text that I would suggest to reluctant students of history for that reason alone.

But there is even more to this book.

Davis not only explores many different aspects of the Civil War, but he also includes smaller things that just take this book over the top for me as far as recommendations go. One thing he includes is a list of famous people who took part in the Civil war and gives the reader more information about what happened to them until their death. This is excellent for a reference guide. Then there is an excellent and copious list of book recommendations included in the back of the book covering nearly every topic imaginable. On the other hand there are a few things to be aware of.

Firstly, This is a book for those people who do not know a lot about the Civil War, and if you already know a lot, then you won't find much new information, but that is what you can gather from the title. Secondly, for those of you that have the edition, the USS Monitor was actually raised back in , which, obviously, is not included in this edition of the book. Still, these are extremely small pickings compared to what is on offer here.

Navigation menu

If you are a reluctant student who has to write a report, or if you are someone like me who just wants a quick reminder of what important events happened during this time, then this is the book for you. I give it a five out of five. Jun 05, Jason Robinson rated it really liked it. I finally finished this book after about 7 weeks of occasional reading in between while I was reading other things. Chock full of information and a good complement to the novels I have been reading the last few months about the civil war.

This is a really helpful book in better understanding the Civil War, not only because the author goes through all the events chronologically, but also because he starts at the very beginnings of America itself to provide a full look at what ultimately brought the country to that divisive point. His way of writing is certainly not boring or dry. He presents the human side of the war, as well as the ba This is a really helpful book in better understanding the Civil War, not only because the author goes through all the events chronologically, but also because he starts at the very beginnings of America itself to provide a full look at what ultimately brought the country to that divisive point.

He presents the human side of the war, as well as the battles and facts that come with it. Jun 09, Michael rated it really liked it.


  • Developmental Aspects in Learning to Write.
  • Explore Related Topics:.
  • Techniques of pleasure: BDSM and the circuits of sexuality.
  • Being amoral : psychopathy and moral incapacity!

I really didn't know much about the Civil War before picking up this book. I had vague shapes in my head, rumors about battles, ideas that one side wore gray, the other blue.